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WEI Annual Report Now Available

Published February 2017

Women Enabled International is pleased to release our 2016 Annual Report highlighting the accomplishments we've made this year.

  • May 1, 2017 WEI Submission to OHCHR on Access to Justice for Women and Girls with Disabilities  

    This submission provides guidance on the rights of women and girls to the U.N. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) for its forthcoming report to the Human Rights Council on Article 13 (access to justice) of the U.N Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Because women and girls with disabilities are subjected to gender-based violence, including unique forms of violence such as forced sterilization or abortion, experience violence at higher rates than other women, access to justice following this is especially important for ensuring their rights. Women and girls with disabilities, however, also face myriad barriers to accessing justice due to both their gender and disability. These include legal barriers, as courts may not recognize them as competent witnesses or the justice system may not recognize the violence committed against them as crimes. They also include accessibility barriers, including physical, informational, and communications accessibility. Women and girls with disabilities may also face attitudinal barriers to accessing justice, including as the result of stereotypes about their sexuality and ability to parent. Finally, women and girls with disabilities may be less likely to afford attorneys or court costs, or may suffer more directly from cuts to social services that support access to justice. Based on these barriers, Women Enabled International provides recommendations to OHCHR for information and recommendations to include in its report.
    WEI Submission to OHCHR Report on CRPD Article 13 Access to Justice & Women with Disabilities May 1, 2017 FINAL.pdf

    WEI Submission to OHCHR Report on CRPD Article 13 Access to Justice & Women with Disabilities May 1, 2017 FINAL.docx
  • April 21, 2017 Click here to read the article on the importance of fundraising.WHY FUND THE RIGHTS OF WOMEN WITH DISABILITIES?

    Leading advocates and women's rights donors agree that much more can and needs to be done to include women with disabilities in women's rights activism, agenda setting, and funding. This brief explores funding at the intersection of women's rights and disability rights and offers steps donors can take to ensure that their grantmaking is more incusive of women with disabilities and to support this emerging movement.

    Women Enabled International's groundbreaking Mapping Project is an important tool in fundraising efforts.

    Read a PDF of this article written by Philanthropy for Women's Human Rights.


  • April 14, 2017 Women Enabled International Guide to CRPD General Comment No. 3: Women and Girls with Disabilities

    This guide to General Comment No. 3 on women and girls with disabilities (GC3) from the United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD Committee) attempts to pull together  the information contained in disparate parts of GC3 on the major themes it covers, including gender-based violence, sexual and reproductive health and rights, and access to justice. This guide also brings together the recommendations that the CRPD Committee makes in GC3 about eliminating discrimination and stereotypes and ensuring equality for women and girls with disabilities.

    This guide is divided into six sections:
     
    · Discrimination, Equality, and the Content of Article 6;
    · Respect, Protect, Fulfill Framework;
    · Stereotypes;
    · Gender-based Violence;
    · Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR); and
    · Access to Justice.
     
    These are the major themes covered by GC3. However, GC3 also addresses other issues, including legal capacity, employment, public participation, and education, among others. The charts below include these issues as they are relevant to the themes above, but GC3 may also contain additional information on these topics and should be directly consulted as needed.

    WEI Guide to CRPD General Comment No 3 on Women UPDATED FINAL GC TEXT April 2017.pdf

    WEI Guide to CRPD General Comment No 3 on Women UPDATED FINAL GC TEXT April 2017.docx

  • January 30, 2017 Women Enabled International Submission to the Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial, Summary or Arbitrary Killings on Domestic Violence and Infanticide Regarding Women and Girls with Disabilities.

    On January 30, 2017, WEI responded to a call for submissions by the U.N. Special Rapporteur on Extrajudicial, Summary, or Arbitrary Killing to support the Special Rapporteur’s efforts to incorporate a gender-sensitive approach to extrajudicial, summary, or arbitrary killing into her work. WEI’s submission provides information on the high rates of domestic violence that women and girls with disabilities face, and the lack of access to justice—factors that can elevate the risk of domestic violence escalating and leading to arbitrary killing. The submission also identifies factors that contribute to heightened rates of infanticide of children, and especially girls, with disabilities. The submission urges the Special Rapporteur to consider how different characteristics, such as disability, intersect with gender to expose women and girls to a heightened risk of arbitrary killings. The submission also identifies core state obligations to address the underlying factors that contribute to a heightened risk of women and girls with disabilities to arbitrary killings, including stigma, a lack of support for individuals with disabilities and their families, and issues surrounding access to protective and rehabilitative services and justice mechanisms for victims of gender-based violence with disabilities. The submission also highlights the challenges presented by the lack of disaggregated data on violence, femicide, and infanticide directed at women and girls with disabilities.

    WEI-Submission-to-SR-EJEs-on-Domestic-Violence-and-Infanticide-Women-and-Girls-with-Disabilities-January-30-2017-Final.pdf

    WEI-Submission-to-SR-EJEs-on-Domestic-Violence-and-Infanticide-Women-and-Girls-with-Disabilities-January-30-2017-Final.docx

  • January 30, 2017 WEI submitted comments to the UN CEDAW Committee on the CEDAW Committee’s Draft General Recommendation addressing gender-related dimensions in disaster risk reduction (DRR) in the face of a changing climate. WEI’s submission, which was endorsed by 10 other non-governmental organizations from around the world, identifies unique barriers that women with disabilities face in the context of natural disasters. WEI then makes specific suggestions on how the CEDAW Committee could edit draft General Recommendation to better address the specific barriers that women with disabilities encounter in emergency settings.

    General Recommendation on the gender-related dimensions of disaster risk reduction in a changing climate – Implications for Women with Disabilities, January 30, 2017.pdf

    General Recommendation on the gender-related dimensions of disaster risk reduction in a changing climate – Implications for Women with Disabilities, January 30, 2017.docx

    This submission was endorsed by: Advocacy for Women with Disability Initiative (Nigeria); Agate Center for Women with Special Needs (Armenia); Legal Defence and Assistance Project (LEDAP) (Nigeria); National Union of Women with Disabilities of Uganda (NUWODU); Programa de Acción por la Igualdad y la Inclusión Social (PAIIS) (Colombia); Samarthyam - Women with Disabilities Forum for Action (India); Shanta Memorial Rehabilitation Centre (India);  Sisters of Frida (UK); Magdalena Szarota, Doctoral Research Student, Centre for Disability Research, Lancaster University and Co-Founder, Association of Disabled Women ONE.pl (Poland); and Women with Disabilities India Network (WWDIN).

  • January 28, 2017 WEI and UN Population Fund (UNFPA) Standards and Implementation Tool in Development

    UNFPA engaged Women Enabled International (WEI) to research and draft the Standards and Implementation Tool to provide guidance for key stakeholders on the provision of quality, human rights-based sexual and reproductive health services and gender-based violence services for women and young people with disabilities.

    The purpose of the Tool is to provide practical and concrete guidance to key stakeholders who develop and implement programs, policies, and laws around access to sexual and reproductive healthcare and gender-based violence, with a particular focus on service providers, to ensure that such efforts conform with State’s human rights obligations to respect, protect, and fulfill the rights of women and young people with disabilities in these crucial areas.  

    Click here for the UNFPA/WEI Standards and Implementation Tool project page

  • January 13, 2016 WEI President Stephanie Ortoleva was an invited expert to the Expert Group Meeting Women with Disabilities - Development & Society Santiago de Chile 11-2016 The Division for Social Policy and Development (DSPD) of DESA co-organized with the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (UNECLAC) in Santiago de Chile, Chile, an Expert Group Meeting under the theme “Advancing the rights and perspectives of women and girls with disabilities in development and society” from 15-17 November 2016. The meeting included experts from around the world including those with experience in: disability, women’s rights, gender equality and empowerment of women, social and economic development, and research. Stephanie Ortoleva was one of the invited participants and she made a presentation entitled “Accountability - responding to Disabled Women’s Needs, disasters & humanitarian crises” (see below for presentation). The meeting resulted in a set of recommendations to support operationalization of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and other internationally agreed goals, in a way that is inclusive of and responsive to the needs and perspectives of women and girls with disabilities. The meeting also will contribute towards a Secretary-General Report on the situation of women and girls with disabilities.

    For documents relating to the EGM as well as the forthcoming EGM Outcome Document, see: https://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/about-us/expert-group-meetings/egm2016_women_chile.html

    Download the presentation in PowerPoint pptx format: Accountability- Experiences in Responding to Specific Needs of Women & Girls with Disabilities in Disasters & Humanitarian Crises: A Human Rights Based Approach

    Download the presentation in PDF format
  • WEI accountABILITY Toolkit to be Published in Summer 2017


    December 20, 2016

     

    A woman draws a network on a global map.In the twenty-first century, women across the globe continue to experience gender-based discrimination that impedes the full realization of their human rights. Women are continually denied access to basic healthcare, housing, education, work and social security.

    Women and girls with disabilities in particular encounter multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination on the basis of both gender and ability, including high rates of violence, lack of access to justice, and denial of sexual and reproductive health information and services.

    International human rights law calls on governments to dismantle legal, structural, social, economic, and other barriers that women face in achieving equality and realizing their human rights. Human rights advocacy can be an effective tool for holding governments to account for their obligations under international human rights law and pushing for effective implementation of human rights and gender equality.

    Women Enabled International’s soon-to-be-released toolkit seeks to empower women with disabilities and organizations, working on their behalf to make use of available U.N. human rights mechanisms to ensure that the human rights violations women with disabilities experience receive redress and to make sure that statements, recommendations, observations, and guidance from the U.N. incorporate an intersectional gender and disability rights perspective.

    Increased attention to and guidance on how international human rights standards apply to the specific human rights issues facing women and girls with disabilities will help advance the rights of women and girls with disabilities worldwide.

    Click here for more information on this exciting project

  • November 12, 2016 WEI submitted this short report on the rights of girls with disabilities to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) for a forthcoming OHCHR report, Protection of the Rights of the Child and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. While addressing the question, "What approaches to implementing the 2030 Agenda would ensure the protection of the rights of all children, and that no child is left behind?," this report examines the disparities that girls with disabilities face in accessing education and exercising the right to health, including sexual and reproductive health. It also notes the higher rates of violence, including gender-based violence, against girls with disabilities, as well as barriers they face in accessing justice and participating in accountability mechanisms. Finally, the report includes recommendations for how states can implement the Sustainable Development Goals in a way that respects, protects, and fulfills the human rights of girls with disabilities.

    WEI OHCHR Submission for Report on Child Rights and 2030 SDG Agenda October 17, 2016 Final.pdf

    WEI OHCHR Submission for Report on Child Rights and 2030 SDG Agenda October 17, 2016 Final.docx


  • November 12, 2016 WEI submitted this short report on the rights of girls with disabilities to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) for a forthcoming OHCHR report, Protection of the Rights of the Child and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. While addressing the question, "What approaches to implementing the 2030 Agenda would ensure the protection of the rights of all children, and that no child is left behind?," this report examines the disparities that girls with disabilities face in accessing education and exercising the right to health, including sexual and reproductive health. It also notes the higher rates of violence, including gender-based violence, against girls with disabilities, as well as barriers they face in accessing justice and participating in accountability mechanisms. Finally, the report includes recommendations for how states can implement the Sustainable Development Goals in a way that respects, protects, and fulfills the human rights of girls with disabilities.

    WEI OHCHR Submission for Report on Child Rights and 2030 SDG Agenda October 17, 2016 Final.pdf

    WEI OHCHR Submission for Report on Child Rights and 2030 SDG Agenda October 17, 2016 Final.docx


  • November 12, 2016 WEI prepared this short submission on the rights of women and girls with psychosocial disabilities sent to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) for a forthcoming OHCHR report on mental health and human rights. Following up on a Human Rights Council resolution on this topic, the OHCHR report will focus on violations of in the context of mental health provision and interpreting legal standards to ensure the respect, protection, and fulfillment of all human rights. WEI's submission focuses on violations faced disproportionately by women and girls with psychosocial disabilities, including forced and coerced reproductive health procedures, gender-based violence, and barriers to accessing justice. It also provides interpretations of relevant articles of the CRPD and other human rights conventions, with recommendations about how states should implement these conventions to tackle human rights abuses against women and girls with psychosocial disabilities.

    WEI OHCHR Mental Health and Human Rights October 31, 2016 FINAL.pdf

    WEI OHCHR Mental Health and Human Rights October 31, 2016 FINAL.docx


  • November 12, 2016 WEI--alongside local partners Advocacy for Women with Disabilities Initiative (AWWDI), Legal Defence and Assistance Project (LEDAP), and Inclusive Friends Association--submitted a shadow letter to the CEDAW Committee to help the Committee develop a list of issues for its forthcoming review of Nigeria. The letter highlights that, because of their disability and their gender, women and girls with disabilities in Nigeria face multiple layers of discrimination and stereotypes about their capabilities that mean they are given less priority in families, have less access to education, and are considered less eligible for marriage or to found families. Additionally, women and girls with disabilities are subjected to violence--particularly sexual violence--at higher rates, and in Nigeria's conflict zones, they are frequently left behind when violence comes to their communities, with little access to justice or services. Finally, women with disabilities find that sexual and reproductive health information and services, including those to prevent and address HIV, are not accessible to them and that stereotypes they do not have sex and cannot become parents are pervasive. The shadow letter concludes with several recommendations for the CEDAW Committee to include when developing the list of issues for its review of Nigeria's women's rights record and for concluding observations following the review in July 2017.

    WEI and Nigeria Partners, CEDAW LOI Submission Women with Disabilities October 14, 2016 FINAL.docx

    WEI and Nigeria Partners, CEDAW LOI Submission Women with Disabilities October 14, 2016 FINAL.pdf


  • November 1, 2016 If you are a United States Government Employee, select WEI when you make your donations for the Combined Federal Campaign this giving season, which ends Dec. 15, 2016. Our CFC number is 44169.   Help us make a difference!
  • New Book! The first time 17-year-old Nujeen Mustafa saw the sea, she and her wheelchair were hauled on to an overcrowded dinghy headed for Europe. Growing up in the Syrian cities of Manbij and Aleppo, Mustafa – who was born with cerebral palsy – rarely left the house. Last September, Mustafa traveled 3,500 miles across hostile borders and perilous seas to Germany in a wheelchair, with the help of her sister. She describes the odyssey in a new book “Nujeen: One Girl’s Incredible Journey from War-Torn Syria in a Wheelchair,” co-authored by veteran British journalist Christina Lamb. A year after her journey, Mustafa lives outside Cologne, Germany, with two of her sisters and four nieces. In Syria, she was largely self-taught and learned English by watching American soap opera “Days of our Lives.” She now attends a school for people with disabilities and has learned German. Meanwhile, Mustafa is still waiting for documents to allow her to stay in Germany and apply for her parents to join her from Turkey.


    Nujeen: One Girl's Incredible Journey from War-Torn Syria in a Wheelchair
    by Nujeen Mustafa and Christina Lamb
  • WEI Global Women with Disabilities Rights Advocacy Report
    Originally Published March 8, 2016. Last Updated January 14, 2017


    A woman draws a network on a global map.Women Enabled International (WEI) received generous funding from an anonymous donor for a Survey Project to foster a greater understanding of human rights advocacy for the rights of women and girls with disabilities, by disabled women ourselves and within the women's rights and disability rights movements,. Through an online survey and interviews, WEI produces this comprehensive report of the field of advocates for the rights of women and girls with disabilities globally and nationally, released on March 8, 2016, International Women's Day.

    Click here for project details and mapping project report.

    8/31/2016 update: A new supporting document entitled "The Funding Gap" has been added to the WEI Survey and Mapping Project.

    10/24/2016 update: Respondent appendices have been updated - see Appendices IIIA and IIIB.

    WEI Global Disabled Womens Rights Advocacy Report - The Funding Gap (PDF format) | (Word docx format)

  • October 2016


    WEI Statement on Women's Rights & Disability Rights at "A Rights-Based Approach to Zika: Putting Women and Girls at the Center of the Global Response," organized by the Center for Health and Gender Equity (CHANGE), Anis - Instituto de Bioetica, International Planned Parenthood Federation/Western Hemisphere Region (IPPF/WHR), and Promundo-US, in partnership with the Embassy of Sweden, Held on Thursday, September 29
  • October 2016 Three New Universal Periodic Review Submissions have been created.

  1. WEI and Women with Disabilities India Network Joint Submission to the Human Rights Council’s  Universal Periodic Review of India

    Women Enabled International, working with Women with Disabilities India Network, compiled this submission for India’s upcoming third Universal Periodic Review at the Human Rights Council in Geneva. Drawing on India’s international commitments, this submission focuses on violence against women with disabilities, access to sexual and reproductive health services, and access to justice. As the submission illustrates, women with disabilities in India disproportionately face violations of these rights, due to discrimination based on both their gender and disability and stereotypes about their capability, sexuality, and role within families. The submission provides targeted questions and recommendations on these topics for India’s UPR, which will take place in April/May 2017. 

    Read PDF WEI WWDIN India UPR Submission September 2016.pdf
    Read Word file WEI WWDIN India UPR Submission September 2016.docx

  2. WEI and Sisters of Frida Joint Submission to the Human Rights Council’s Universal Periodic Review of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

    Women Enabled International and Sisters of Frida, a collective of women with disabilities in the UK, compiled this submission for the UK’s upcoming third Universal Periodic Review (UPR) at the Human Rights Council in Geneva. This submission focuses on the continuing problem of violence against women with disabilities in the UK, as they face higher rates of sexual violence and experience domestic violence at twice the rate of other women. Women with disabilities are also less likely to have the economic independence to leave an abuser, have fewer accessible options for support services, and face increased barriers to accessing justice, due to disability-related stereotypes and denials of reasonable accommodation. The submission provides targeted questions and recommendations on these topics for states to utilize during the UK’s UPR, which will take place in April/May 2017.

    Read PDF WEI and SOF UK UPR Submission September 2016.pdf
    Read Word file WEI and SOF UK UPR Submission September 2016.docx

  3. WEI Submission to the CEDAW Committee on its update to its General Recommendation No. 19 on Violence Against Women by WEI, with sign on support from eight non-governmental organizations around the world.

    This submission was drafted by Women Enabled International (WEI) and is endorsed by: Advocacy for Women with Disabilities Initiative (AWWDI) (Nigeria); Association of Disabled Women, ONE.pl (Poland); CREA (India); Handicap International's Making It Work Initiative on Gender and Disability (France); Legal Defence and Assistance Project (LEDAP) (Nigeria); National Union of Women with Disabilities of Uganda (NUWODU); Shanta Memorial Rehabilitation Centre (India); Sisters of Frida (United Kingdom); and Women with Disabilities India Network (WWDIN).

    Based on the specific issues that women with disabilities experience when exercising their right to be free from violence, this submission provides targeted comments to the CEDAW Committee on its Draft update to General Recommendation No. 19 (1992): accelerating elimination of gender-based violence against women. These comments focus both on how to more explicitly include women with disabilities in the draft and also how to ensure that the draft’s provisions adequately address the barriers and issues that women with disabilities disproportionately face when exercising their right to be free from violence. As such, this submission provides both suggested amendments to the current paragraphs of the draft General Recommendation and suggestions for additional paragraphs and sections to include in the draft.

    The amendments suggested in this submission are important for our work on the rights of women with disabilities for several reasons. Although many of the countries that have ratified CEDAW have also ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), and the CRPD Committee recently issued a general comment on the rights of women and girls with disabilities that addresses gender-based violence, there is not a perfect overlap between states parties to the two conventions. Additionally, although the CRPD Committee has weighed in on many of the issues that lead to violence against women with disabilities—including denying them legal capacity and arbitrarily detaining them in institutions, based on disability—many states have not fully adopted the human rights-based approach to these issues and still allow, and frequently legally permit, these violations to take place. As the CEDAW Committee is the human rights leader in efforts to eliminate violence against women, many states and our organizations would benefit from the CEDAW Committee’s additional guidance on these issues. Finally, by ensuring that women with disabilities are better included in the updated General Recommendation No. 19, the CEDAW Committee will be recognizing the unique experiences of women with disabilities while also including them in the framework of women’s rights, helping to reduce stigma targeted at women with disabilities by ensuring that their experiences are no longer invisible and that they are fully recognized as women and as rights holders.

    Read PDF WEI CEDAW GR19 Update Submission September 30 2016.pdf
    Read Word file WEI CEDAW GR19 Update Submission September 30 2016.docx

  • September 2016 New publication on violence against children with disabilities
    Plan International has released new research on violence against children with disabilities and their access to protection. The study entitled “Protect us! Inclusion of children with disabilities in child protection” was conducted by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. It documents the extremely high levels of school-based violence against children with disabilities and identifies important barriers within the child protection system which stop children with disabilities from reporting violence and getting support, and also offers recommendations. An accessible, executive summary and the full report is available for download at this link: http://plan-international.org/protect-us
      

  • Updated August 24, 2016 Audio added; Originally posted May 15, 2016

    WEI president Stephanie Ortoleva presents at Women Deliver global conference in Copenhagen in May 2016.

    Sexual & Reproductive Health & Rights of Women with Disabilities

    Click here to listen to the audio for Women with Disabilities - Towards Inclusive Politics & Policies

    Date: Thursday, May 19, 2016          Location: Conference Room B3-3            Time: 13:30-14:30

    Women with Disabilities are the world’s largest minority. In the session, presenters will share strategies to link women with disabilities with Sustainable Development Goals implementation and build a transformative cross-sectoral advocacy platform to advance sexuality, disability rights, women’s rights and human rights.

    Stephanie Ortoleva, President & Legal Director, Women Enabled International

    Andrea Parra, Women Enabled International and Aquelarre Trans, Colombia

    Nidhi Goyal, Programme Director, Point of View and Stand Up Comedian

    Katrina Anderson, Senior Human Rights Counsel, Center for Reproductive Rights

    Tanzila Khan, Founder, Creative Alley, Women Deliver Young Leader, Pakistan

    Rupsa Mallik, Director, Programmes and Innovation, CREA
     

  • Updated July 30, 2016  

    WEI President Stephanie Ortoleva expresses outrage over CRPD Committee elections - watch new video clip from the 9th Session of the Conference of States Parties to the CRPD.


    Women Enabled International statement on the CRPD Committee elections (originally posted June 16, 2016)

    Women enabled International is horrified about the results of the 9th Conference of States Parties election of the new members of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Not one woman was elected! We need the voices and experiences of women and girls with disabilities to be represented on this important Committee and, as studies worldwide have shown, electing women to office is the best way to ensure that our needs as disabled women and girls are addressed and effectively reflected in human rights law and international policy and development.




    infographic showing 17 people of one type and 1 of anotherWe must point out that the CRPD itself has clearly spoken on this issue: CRPD Article 34(4) states:

    4. The members of the Committee shall be elected by States Parties, consideration being given to equitable geographical distribution, representation of the different forms of civilization and of the principal legal systems, balanced gender representation and participation of experts with disabilities.

    We note that it was under the leadership of the six women who served on the CRPD Committee that a draft General Comment on CRPD Article 6 on Women was drafted and we passionately hope that it will be adopted in the July CRPD Committee session as clarity and guidance is needed on the understanding of this important CRPD provision.

    Women Enabled International President and Legal Director Stephanie Ortoleva Stated: "Where are the women? The lack of 'balanced gender representation' as required under CRPD Article 34(4) for the CRPD Committee is certainly a dark day for the rights of women and girls with disabilities. we must mobilize to ensure that the next election in 2018 is a gamechanger and results in even greater gender balance. The time to start organizing is NOW!"

    Watch the Women enabled International website and social media for further calls to action!
  • Updated June 22, 2016 Originally posted April 23, 2016 As we all know, the news is filled with discussions regarding the Zika virus, microcephaly, access to abortion, and women's sexual and reproductive rights—sometimes from a medical perspective, sometimes from a community health perspective, sometimes from a women's rights perspective, and occasionally from a disability rights perspective. When confronted with such an emotional issue in a climate of medical uncertainty and insecurity, nuanced language is often not reflected in the dialogues. After reading many of these perspectives, Women Enabled International (WEI) sets out a more nuanced perspective to frame a discussion that reflects the inherent rights and dignity of all affected by the Zika virus based on an intersectional disability and women's human rights perspective. We begin with an overview of the key medical facts as we understand them based on current scientific evidence, recognizing that new information is emerging on a regular basis, to ensure that this conversation is grounded in a common understanding of existing evidence. We conclude with an overview of some of the core international legal obligations that underpin the perspectives we layout in this document.

    Please see WEI's Talking Points below in English, Spanish and Portuguese. We hope these are helpful and that they contribute to the discussions. Please contact us with any questions at Info@WomenEnabled.org.  We greatly appreciate Translators Without Borders for these translations into Spanish and Portuguese .

    English WEI Talking Points Zika, Microcephaly, Womens Rights and Disability Rights PDF  |   Word docx file

    Espanol WEI Temas de debate: Zika, microcefalia, derechos de la mujer y derechos de las personas con discapacidad PDF    |   Word docx file

    Portuguese WEI Pontos de Discussão: Zika, Microcefalia, Direitos das Mulheres e Direitos das Pessoas com Deficiência PDF    |  Word docx file

     
  • May 11, 2016 Women Enabled International President Stephanie Ortoleva was named one of Women's eNews' 21 Leaders for the 21st Century in 2016 — She Rises Up for Disabled Women and Girls!

    Women Enabled International's own President and Founder, Stephanie Ortoleva, was honored on May 2nd by Women’s eNews at their New York City Gala, as a leader for the 21st Century. During the event, Stephanie was recognized as a leader who "…has made it her mission to change the rules that constrict the lives of women and girls across the globe." Watch a short excerpt of Stephanie's acceptance speech from the gala here:


     

  • May 10, 2016 Together with the Human Rights and Gender Justice Clinic at CUNY School of Law, Women Enabled International submitted this amicus brief in the case of I.V. v. Bolivia, before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. I.V., a Peruvian political refugee, was forcibly sterilized during a cesarean section in 2000. This case marks the first time that the Inter-American Court will consider the human rights implications of sterilization without consent, a practice that is disproportionately perpetrated against women who encounter high rates of stigma, such as women living with HIV, poor women, ethnic or national minorities or women with disabilities because some health care providers believe that these women should not have children or that they are unable to make reproductive decisions on their own behalf. Our amicus brief emphasizes the severe physical and mental harms that forced sterilization imposes on women—16 years after her sterilization, I.V. still acutely feels the emotional and psychological toll of having been sterilized without her consent—and analyzes prevailing international standards to demonstrate that forced sterilization is a form of cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment and, in some cases, may amount to torture. We urge the Inter-American Court to join U.N. and European human rights experts in recognizing the gravity of this human rights violation.
  • April 23, 2016 As we all know, the news is filled with discussions regarding the Zika virus, microcephaly, access to abortion, and women's sexual and reproductive rights—sometimes from a medical perspective, sometimes from a community health perspective, sometimes from a women's rights perspective, and occasionally from a disability rights perspective. When confronted with such an emotional issue in a climate of medical uncertainty and insecurity, nuanced language is often not reflected in the dialogues. After reading many of these perspectives, Women Enabled International (WEI) sets out a more nuanced perspective to frame a discussion that reflects the inherent rights and dignity of all affected by the Zika virus based on an intersectional disability and women's human rights perspective. We begin with an overview of the key medical facts as we understand them based on current scientific evidence, recognizing that new information is emerging on a regular basis, to ensure that this conversation is grounded in a common understanding of existing evidence. We conclude with an overview of some of the core international legal obligations that underpin the perspectives we layout in this document.

    Please see WEI's Talking Points below. We hope these are helpful and that they contribute to the discussions.
  • January 2016 Stephanie Ortoleva named one of Women's E-News 21 Leaders of 2016.

    Stephanie Ortoleva, Esq. By Eryn Mathewson, Women's E-News

    Stephanie Ortoleva jokes that she has never lost her vision because that would imply that she put it somewhere. She prefers to just describe the condition she has lived with since childhood as degenerative low vision. This New York City native is not shy about the fact that she is blind. The prominent activist gives her age as somewhere between 18 and 80, though she says she acts like an 18-year-old most of the time. The purple streaks in her hair are the proof.

    Stephanie Ortoleva, Esq. is the founder and president of Women Enabled International, based in Washington, D.C. She and her staff work to advocate for the human rights of women and girls, especially those with disabilities. The team is developing projects that map and promote collaboration among women's rights and disability advocates, laying the groundwork for cross-cutting advocacy. " . . . there are many wonderful women who are activists with disabilities, and I wish all of my sisters would get powerful attention."

    Her organization's work "has grown and strengthened human rights law, holding states accountable for their obligations to respect, protect, and fulfill the rights of women and girls with disabilities," Ortoleva said. Fortunately, limited vision was not the only major development of Ortoleva's youth. It was around this time that the budding women's and disability rights activist was told that she was too opinionated and asked too many questions. Instead of interpreting these observations as insults, she saw them as good reasons to go to law school.

    A degree from Hofstra University's progressive law school enabled her to become an international human rights lawyer. Her focus is on the intersectionality of women's rights, disability rights, gender-based violence and education for women and girls. Eventually, she consulted on these issues for governmental, non-governmental and international agencies, and she worked as a human rights lawyer with the U.S. State Department. She has led discussions at prominent forums like the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women and she has critiqued these institutions on how well they accommodate participants with disabilities.

    When she is not at the office, Ortoleva serves as a member of the American Bar Association Commission on Disability Rights. She is also on the boards of several other disability rights and women's rights groups. In her spare time, Ortoleva hangs out with her husband of over 30 years and her orchids. Ortoleva is credited with bringing attention and resources to women's and disability rights, but she emphatically reminds supporters that "there are many wonderful women who are activists with disabilities, and I wish all of my sisters would get powerful attention." Stephanie will be honored at the Women's E-News award ceremony on May 2, 2016 in New York City -- see their website for event details www.WomensENews.org

    View this article at http://womensenews.org/2016/01/21-women-leaders-2016-meet-three-powerhouses-who-rise-up-for-the-marginalized/

  • January 2016 The Right to Adequate Housing for Persons with Disabilities Living in Cities – Urban Women with Disabilities
    As established in international law and the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda, it is necessary to pay attention to the rights and needs of persons with disabilities. Persons with disabilities are disproportionately represented in the poorest quintile of the population, and face additional challenges due to discriminatory laws and policies, environmental barriers, and lack of support services that would enable the enjoyment of the right to adequate housing on an equal basis with others. This study reviews the literature on the meaning and impact of the right to adequate housing for persons with disabilities in cities. It uses the foundational framework of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR), and demonstrates how the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) provides a new understanding of this complex right. The authors link the right to adequate housing not only to other international treaties, but also to the diverse groups of individuals who are persons with disabilities and the complexity of the identities involved. They outline major types of barriers that persons with disabilities encounter (physical inaccessibility, lack of access to transportation services, insecurity of tenure, among others), and identify trends in relation to policy and legal framework and national and sub-national solutions to the realization of the rights of persons with disabilities. The report takes a human rights-based approach to development of human settlements that offer equal opportunities to persons with disabilities. The report offers three case studies that highlight some good practices and topics worthy of further inquiry. Read more.
  • January 2016 WEI CSW60 Side Panel Announced. Sustainable Development Goals or Sidelining Disabled Girls?: Making SDGs Stand for All Women and Girls March 17, 2016 Read more.

 

2011-2015 News archive 

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Contact WEI:
Stephanie Ortoleva, Esq.,

President and Founder

Women Enabled International, Inc.
1875 Connecticut Ave NW, 10th Floor
Washingon D.C. 20009

+1.202.630.3818



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